Archive for the 'Victims of Katrina' Category

FIRE THE MARKETING EXECS AT DIRECTV NOW

March 28, 2011



DirecTV online contact form

Clueless Katrina Comments
Media Oversight

What are dueling media banjos?

August 28, 2010

Talk about political mumbo jumbo that diverts from the fundamental idea and this comes into focus.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/08/28/mlk.niece.beck/index.html?iref=obnetwork

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2010/08/28/sharpton-led-rally-recalls-kings-dream-speech/

Someone got it right.
The Restoring Honor Rally is a non-political and non-partisan event. All proceeds will go to the 501 (c)3 charity The Special Operations Warrior Foundation (SOWF).

Another dueling banjo – Michelle Malkin

“Post-racial America, we never knew you.”

AMEN.

See also :
“The most obvious point is that the media focus on race and poverty has tended to mask the issue of age.”
http://understandingkatrina.ssrc.org/Bytheway/index2.html


Restoring Honor


Why are they still missing……?

Who cares for the welfare of the elderly in Louisiana?

Is the VOO program hiring commercial fisherman, first?

June 2, 2010

This story from Bayou, Le Batre, Ala. really started the day off.

“At issue, according to those there, is that recreational boat owners are being hired before those who make their livelihoods solely from fishing local waters.”

URL

Evidently, BP’s VOO program is in question, “We are adjusting the vessels of opportunity program to give priority to commercial vessels and fisherman.”

There’s a post in the Louisiana Sportsman forum stating that boat captains could be paid $35/hr just to drive the boat. I wonder what that’s all about.

What does a fishing community look like?

June 2, 2010

Fishing Communities Facts

Many communities in the Gulf of Mexico were
originally founded to exploit the rich marine resources.

Some communities in the Gulf of Mexico, for example,
Empire and Venice in Louisiana, are below sea level
and protected by levies.

In many coastal communities, fishermen can no
longer afford to live near the water because
increasing development and redevelopment of these
areas has raised the cost of living beyond their means.

Seafood processing and sales

In 2006, there were 174 fish processing plants and
255 wholesale businesses located in the Gulf region
that together employed 10,841 workers.

Louisiana had the most wholesaler plants in 2006
(126) that together employed 661 workers, while
Texas had the second highest number (77) that
together employed 825 workers.

Shrimp fishery

The combination of long term increases in expenses
including marine diesel fuel, combined with the
dramatic increase in the amount of relatively cheap
imported farm raised shrimp, is making it very
difficult for many Gulf fishermen to make a living in
commercial fishing. Over 90% of the Nation’s shrimp
supply is now imported.

Vietnamese fishermen are now an important part of
the shrimp fishery in Mississippi and Louisiana.

Recreational fishing

Florida had the most saltwater recreational fishermen
in the United States in 2006: 3.7 million, and another
2.9 million saltwater anglers from other states
reported saltwater fishing trips to Florida in that year.
These recreational fishermen released just over 44%
of their catch in 2006.

Historical context

Coastal dwelling American Indians relied on the Gulf
of Mexico’s inshore marine resources for part of their
subsistence for thousands of years before Europeans
began arriving in the 16th century.

Some of the first scientific studies of the Gulf’s fishery
resources were begun in 1884 by the U.S.
Commission of Fish and Fisheries. They eventually
included surveys of the oyster beds in areas near
Apalachicola, Florida, and inshore waters of Alabama
as well as other areas.
[Source: Gulf Summary Communities]

“Overall, 30 fishing communities in Alabama, 99 in Louisiana, 14 in Mississippi, 68 in Texas, and 119 in West Florida have been profiled by NMFS social scientists because of the nature of their links with commercial and/or recreation fishing. In 2006, 14 United States’ top fifty ports by landings revenue were located in the Gulf region. They were: Bayou La Batre, Alabama; Dulac-Chauvin, Empire-Venice, Golden Meadow-Leeville, Intracoastal City. Lafitte-Barataria. Louisiana: Brownwsville-Port Isabel. Port Arthur, Galveston and Palacios, Texas; and Apalachicola, Fort Myers, Key West, Tampa Bay- st. Petersburg, Florida. On average, the Gulf of Mexico accounted for 21% of U.S. annual landing revenue from 1997-2006.

The Gulf’s top fishing communities were typically smaller towns and villages with populations below 20,000 persons. However, on major metropolitan center approaching 2 million (Houston, Texas), and a few larger coastal cities also have significant fisheries involvement (Tampa and St. Petersburg, Florida; Mobile, Alabama; and Brownsville, Texas) Louisiana’s and Alabama’s top fishing communities are most likely to have populations below 5,000.Nine of Louisiana’s top ten fishing communities and seven of Alabama’s top ten fishing communities fall in this group.”

[Source: NOAA Fisheries Service – Southeast Region – Publications,
http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/sf/socialsci/socialsci.htm, Accessed: June 2, 2010. No date cited. See also: Identifying Communities Associated with the Fishing Industry in Louisiana]

What is a human text message?

June 2, 2010

Matt Perterson: Never Again! Gulf Coast
Matt Pertsen: Never Again! Gulf Coast
Matt Petersen: Never AGain! Gulf Coast
From URL

Cop Killer’s Aunt: My House Looks Like It Was Hit By Hurricane Katrina

December 4, 2009

Totally Clueless Katrina Comment

Oh no you didn’t! I guess you think your house was slabbed? I don’t THINK SO!

Gaynell Tipado, your boy is tough

January 21, 2009

This story broke my heart this morning.  If anyone knows Gaynell Tipado, please contact the Romulus, Michagan PD.  The story indicates that they are looking for relatives.

Mich. police: Boy, 8, spent 10 days with dead mom

Buildings in an apartment complex where an 8-year-old boy who survived Hurricane AP – Buildings in an apartment complex where an 8-year-old boy who survived Hurricane Katrina spent more than …

ROMULUS, Mich. – An 8-year-old boy lived for more than a week with the body of his dead mother before telling a concerned shopkeeper his mom was “in a better place,” police said. Gaynell Tipado, 41, apparently died Jan. 9 in their apartment in the Detroit suburb of Romulus, and the boy survived in part by eating dried rice, butter and flour, authorities said.

The family moved to Michigan from Louisiana after surviving Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Foul play was not suspected in Tipado’s death, and an autopsy was pending.

Lee Saco told The Associated Press that the boy and his mother came into Romulus Liquor regularly for about a year and a half. But four times during the past week the boy uncharacteristically walked about a block to the store by himself — sometimes through Arctic cold and other times wearing pajama bottoms.

“I questioned him, ‘Where is your mom?'” Saco said when the boy first came into the store by himself to buy milk, chips, candy and bread with cash. During the next two visits, he said the boy bought a number of items, including bread.

Saco, who co-owns the store with his brother Sam, said he was curious from the beginning but his concern heightened on Monday when the boy tried to buy $34.80 worth of grocery items — including nacho cheese dip, a package each of processed ham and turkey, hamburger buns, milk, doughnuts and candy — with his mother’s credit card.

Saco then asked the boy if he could speak to his mother. “Is she alive?” Saco asked the boy.

“She’s in a better place,” the boy replied, who later told Saco he’d tried to revive his mother by pushing on her chest in an apparent attempt at CPR.

“I sat him down, gave him chocolate milk. Then I called Romulus PD,” Saco said.

Police arrived and took the boy home. They called Saco about 10 minutes later to tell him the boy’s mother was dead.

The boy was home-schooled, has no siblings and his father died several years ago, authorities said. The child is in foster care while police try to locate his other relatives, Romulus police Lt. John Leacher said.

“It’s sad. It’s very hard. It’s very unfortunate for him,” said Lee Saco, 36, a father of three young children. “I just feel bad. What he had to see for 11 days.

“He came from a good home,” Saco said.

___

Associated Press Writer Ben Leubsdorf in Detroit contributed to this report.