Archive for the 'Texas' Category

Mandatory evac by parish from The Advocate

August 31, 2008

From URL on August 31, 2008

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/27705709.html?showAll=y&c=y

Hurricane Evacuation Listings by parish

* Published: Aug 30, 2008 – UPDATED: 7:25 a.m.

Comments (0)

ASCENSION PARISH
Ascension Parish President Tommy Martinez issued a voluntary evacuation order for all low-lying areas in Ascension Parish because of the potential of extensive flooding in the eastern part of the parish. The areas included are east of La. 431 to the Diversion Canal and north of La. 42 to Bayou Manchac.

ASSUMPTION PARISH
A mandatory evacuation went into effect at 4 p.m. Saturday, said Kim Torres, a spokeswoman for the parish office of emergency preparedness.

CALCASIEU PARISH
A mandatory evacuation has been issued for Sunday at noon.

CAMERON PARISH
A mandatory evacuation is expected to be issued on Sunday morning.

IBERIA PARISH
A mandatory evacuation has been issued for Sunday at 7 a.m.

JEFFERSON PARISH
Mandatory evacuation of Grand Isle began at 1 p.m. on Saturday. A mandatory evacuation for both the West Bank and East Bank was ordered Sunday morning by parish officials.  The mandatory evacuation for the West Bank begins at 9 a.m., with the East Bank mandatory evacuation starting at noon.  A curfew will be in effect starting Sunday, Aug. 31.

LAFOURCHE PARISH
Marshalling points at the Larose Civic Center, Central Lafourche High School and Thibodaux High School will reopen at 7 a.m. today.

A mandatory evacuation was ordered as of 4 p.m. Saturday.

Any resident who signed up to be transported from their home will be taken to one of these marshalling points. They, along with residents who drive themselves to a marshalling point, will be transported out of the parish.

Buses will transport all evacuees to a shelter to be determined.

All marshalling points closed about 7 p.m. Saturday.

LIVINGSTON PARISH
Evacuation is suggested for people living south of Interstate 12 in Livingston Parish, said Brian Fairburn, the parish’s director of emergency preparedness.

A major hurricane surge from Lake Maurepas is expected for the lower part of the parish, emergency officials said.

“If you can get out, secure your residence and get out now,” said Harry Brignac, the French Settlement chief of Police.

“I don’t think we’re going to miss the bullet on this one,” the police chief said.

People can wait until this afternoon to make a decision, but “traffic is going to be horrendous,” he added.

Brignac said his officers will be out in full force until the winds or water get too high, and then will be back on the streets as soon as possible.

Piles of sand have been put out at most fire stations in the parish for people who want to try to sand bag around their homes to hold back the storm surge, Fairburn said.

No shelters have been opened, but North Park and the West Livingston gymnasium will be opened as shelters if necessary, said Will Clark, an aide to the parish president.

ORLEANS PARISH
Orleans Parish has issued a mandatory evacuation for West Bank residents for 8 a.m. Sunday morning. On the East Bank, residents have a mandatory evacuation order beginning at noon Sunday.

PLAQUEMINES PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at noon.

ST. BERNARD PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at 4 p.m.

ST. CHARLES PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at noon.

ST. JAMES PARISH
Parish officials issued a highly recommended evacuation for all residents living south of La. 3127 in the south Vacherie area and those living north of La. 3125 in the Grand Point Area along with residents living in trailers, manufactured homes and flood prone areas.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST
St. John the Baptist Parish has issued a mandatory parishwide evacuation beginning at 8 p.m. Saturday.

ST. MARTIN PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at noon.

ST. MARY PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at 4 p.m.

TANGIPAHOA PARISH
A mandatory evacuation of all mobile homes and travel trailers across the parish goes into effect at 10 a.m. today, Parish President Gordon Burgess said. That evacuation also includes all homes south of La. 22, Burgess said.

“I’m concerned about a 13-to-16-foot storm surge on the south end of the parish and winds of 75 to 100 miles an hour,” the parish president said. “This is a monster.”

TERREBONNE PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at 4 p.m.

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August 31, 2008

Why do FEMA employees read Louisiana Questions?

November 5, 2007

Periodically, I review my referrals. You’ll never guess who surfed into Louisiana Questions…FEMA. My last post Oct. 26th provoked some comments from a FEMA contracted employee who agreed that people still need help in the aftermath of Katrina, more than two years later. All fake news conferences aside…

What’s FEMA doing surfing my blog?

FEMA surfing my blog?!!

The page FEMA viewed was What’s in da news for da parish in august 2007 when the news reported formaldehyde poisoning from FEMA trailers. Recently, I was informed that some people or organizations are selling FEMA trailers in the Northwest. I believe there was a 1-800 number posted on my website during the formaldehyde hubub so that concerned people could call FEMA with questions about their trailers. Why else would FEMA be surfing my blog? Ideas anyone?

Why are they still missing after Hurricane Katrina?

August 18, 2007

I’ve said it before…Katrina didn’t discriminate.  The following report indicates that the poor and the elderly were primarily impacted.  No Kidding.  It took a team of  Doctors and their data to prove that?  All of the hubbub about race playing a role in the aftermath of the disaster infuriates me.   Katrina didn’t discriminate. FEMA wasn’t discriminatory.  It was the leadership at the parish and state level that failed – not just at the time, but has been failing for years.

The news lately about the Recovery School District in New Orleans is a typical example of failure.  Over 17,000 dollars are being given to teachers who decide to come to this district.  Yes, the teachers are needed. No, I don’t think they understand the problems with the New Orleans School Systems existed prior to Katrina.  22 million dollars, for example, went missing….Teachers who didn’t work in the district any longer were being paid!  The measley 17,000 dollars they are being offered is a nice incentive.  I’m just skeptical of the offer. They might be paying for it in the end.

Read further for the complete excerpt of the Katrina related deaths and how the statistics tell the true story of the poor and elderly in Louisiana.  What’s been said about the ICMP and identification of remains and review previous posts on the issue.

Findings On Katrina-Related New Orleans Mortality Data

“Dana Troxclair, MD, Instructor of Pathology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, will present mortality data on Louisiana storm victims at a poster presentation at the 2007 Gulf Coast Post-Katrina Forum of the Gulf States Alliance on August 20, 2007 from 9:45 – 10:15 a.m., 2:45 – 3:15 p.m. and 4:30- 6:00 p.m. at the Beau Rivage Hotel in Biloxi, MS. The research team also included Drs. Robin McGoey, Gary Lipscomb, Richard Tracy, and William Newman, all of the Department of Pathology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans (LSUHSCNO). Drs. Troxclair, Tracy and Newman were among the LSUHSCNO forensic pathologists who performed autopsies on bodies found during rescue and recovery missions following Katrina.

LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans pathologists were responsible for performing more than 820 autopsies on recovered Louisiana victims and report that autopsy findings comprised the single most successful identification technique.

According to the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, 1,464 Louisiana residents perished as a result of Hurricane Katrina and the flooding resulting from failed levees. Of those, 910 victims were examined and identified at two Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team (DMORT) locations.

The LSUHSCNO pathologists were tasked with conducting post-mortem examinations for the primary purpose of identification of the dead. Examinations included field case notes, personal effects, fingerprints, dental, x-ray and autopsy findings, DNA, and anthropology. Nine hundred ten post-mortem files including more than 1,000 dental charts and 30,000+ images have been compiled and stored digitally. Pre-Katrina US Census data on Orleans Parish were analyzed for comparison.

Ninety-six percent of deaths were storm-related and 97% of individuals were positively identified. Twenty-eight percent were identified using autopsy findings-the technique that yielded the highest number of positive ids.

The latest mortality data found that 75% of victims were residents of Orleans parish with 64% older than 65 years of age. The racial distribution was: 56% African-American, 40% Caucasian, 4% Asian, 4% Native American, and 2% Hispanic. For comparison, the pre-storm published Census data concluded that only 12% of the Orleans parish population was older than 65 years of age with a racial distribution as follows: 68% African-American, 29% Caucasian, 3% Hispanic, 2% Asian, and 0.2% Native American. Twenty-six percent of families were below the national poverty line.

The researchers conclude that when final hurricane mortality data is compared to pre-storm Census data, the belief that the hurricane disproportionately destroyed any one race is not substantiated. In fact, deaths among Caucasian, Asian and Native Americans were all overrepresented; while the African-American and Hispanic populations were less impacted. Under appreciated is the fact that our elderly and poor populations, regardless of race, were the most devastated.

“We present that a lesson learned is about those left behind due to lack of physical or financial means,” notes Dr. Troxclair. “Furthermore, based on the remarkable success of the autopsy as a means of human identification, we emphasize its paramount importance as a component of a nation’s response to mass disasters. However, with 135 Louisiana residents still categorized as missing, and 23 human remains yet to be identified, the final impact of the storm remains uncertain.”

There is nothing in this story about the ICMP and the Louisiana Department of Health contracting with them to identify remains. There has been no email to date since the ICMP was questioned if they are still working on identification. Search ICMP on Louisiana Questions for more posts of this story.

From previous post…

Louisiana Questions if the ICMP is still in charge of making those identifications as declared by their 29 December 2005 news release. The news release can be found at the ICMP website. See: Beyond Katrina, ICMP , CNN , Associated Press,

Let nothing be forgotten in this place

Katrina victim’s memorial taken down.

RIP VERA

On Dean

“…Times like this, I can see that the post-traumatic stress disorder is far from post and more a way of life than a disorder.” — G – Bitch comments on Gentilly Girl

Ain’t DIS Fun? – posted by Craig Giesecke at 6:11 PM on August 17, 2007

“…That time of year again, when we pay more attention to what’s going on tropicalwise and try to prognoticate what the hell is going to happen. As a Gulf Coast resident for 25 years (and a Gulf State resident for nearly 50) it’s just part of What We Do.”

“…That said, it’s all just educated speculation for now. Do they take bets on this kinda thing over at Harrah’s?

Dean Expected To Reach The Gulf Wednesday As Category 4 Hurricane
Moreover Technologies – Louisiana news Aug 17 12:06
FortBendNow Aug 17 2007 2:41PM GMT

NOAA Dean

Is Louisiana Prepared if a Storm Comes Our Way?

More News from Humid City
Rising Tide II: Guest Post by Dangerblonde

Why would I buy all that if I wasn’t fixing it?

August 9, 2007

I understood that New Orleans and Louisiana, in general, had affordable housing issues prior to Katrina. Unsightly housing, or blighted housing has affected many in Louisiana. I’ve seen the old barge board, shot gun homes that people are actually living in today. I’ve walked through them before they were scheduled to be demolished. I’ve seen these places all over Louisiana. People need a place to call home, a place to live, and work, and rear their children. Regardless, of the substandard housing…they pay their rent and work and play like everyone else. Sure they complain to the landlords about the structural problems of their home. All of these landlords have one excuse or another as to why they never fixed the leaky roof, the plumbing, or the stove. The rent was cheap and so possibly some tenants did not complain. They were thankful for a place to live. The issues in New Orleans post Katrina are not new, unfortunately. It appears, as far as affordable housing is concerned, that they were only, and I use that term loosely and with sarcastic undertones, exacerbated after the disaster.

Some parishes, cities, or towns, have housing inspectors and some do not. Not everyone affected by Katrina lived in either Baton Rouge or New Orleans. It is an overlooked and under-exploited fact. Most of the inspection issues are applied both at the town, city, or parish level and require little else but an ordinance and the staff to conduct the inspections. Of course, the fees for the inspections are likely the responsibility of landowners. Inspections are just another financial issue for the homeowner/ landlord to deal with that they may not be able to afford.

The post office in the year since Katrina (now two years) had issues in delivering mail to the appropriate person(s) due to the mail forwarding time limits, names, families, etc. For those of you familiar with the postal services’ rules and regulations with regards to forwarding – you understand. I’ve sent letters off in the mail to Katrina damaged neighborhoods only to find the letter back inside my mailbox several weeks to a month later. I’ve had to call local Post Masters in order to verify addresses and tell them how silly they are being, all the while knowing that these people still live at the address I’ve listed, but I have received the letter stamped, “forward expired”.

The WAFB article dated June 2007 states that the city of Baton Rouge gave her six months in order to respond. The article was written in June, and said that the woman was given notice in August of 2006. The home was not damaged by Katrina according to the article, but was damaged by a fire after Katrina in the summer of 2006. The journalist was quick to point out that the original owner of the home, was dead, but did not go into detail. Assuming that the daughter kept her maiden name, which is a large assumption, there are a number of “Davis'” on the Katrina Victim list.

Did the journalist provide pertinent and adequate detail? “Woman Upset the City of Baton Rouge Bulldozed Her Home”.

Bill Crider’s Pop Culture Magazine points out, “We’re here from the government, we’re here to help you.” August 6, 2007 A story from the Ninth Ward’s Jason Banks on KSAT San Antonio, Texas news online.

No One Knows Why Family’s Home Torn Down – Local News Story – KSAT San Antonio: “NEW ORLEANS — Jason Banks got his trash hauled away, obtained a building permit, gutted his Ninth Ward home and was ready to renovate.

But then, the brick house vanished, reduced to a slab in an unwanted demolition.

‘I was heartbroken. I was in tears. I was furious,’ he said.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency said orders to tear down the house came from City Hall — but no one in City Hall is answering questions about Banks’ home.

‘They don’t know why. It happened it wasn’t on the blighted list. The last call I made yesterday, they told me FEMA did it. Then, a guy called me back from FEMA and said they’re not in the business if tearing down homes,’ Banks said.

Jason Banks said he kept his grass cut, paid his taxes and had the home appraised at $147,000. He was just waiting on money from Louisiana Road Home rebuilding program to make repairs to his house.”

And still more housing demolition articles gathered from The Truth Laid Bear.

Map with housing scheduled to be demolished in and around New Orleans. Disregard some misinformed, un-educated commentors who believe the map is a “propaganda” tool. The housing crisis before Katrina was too obvious to those who attempted to solve the problem. . . I wish it were all just propaganda! Internet maps are kewl and their display (ie linked icons – pins, circles, etc. ) oftentimes must be sized largely to create the internet link. Some of the comments here reflect extreme ignorance to both internet map making, and housing issues. Karen, listed below, also has a map of her photographed homes on the chopping block.

Still there are people who believe the housing crisis and issues in New Orleans are exclusive to the “African American” community. I have to give them credit for their media coverage, but I also have to interject that the short sighted focus on larger cities, and racial prejudice is getting into muddy water. Everyone deserves a place to call home – is my point exclusively. Others choose to make housing in New Orleans a racial issue. They can. It is their right. However wrong I feel about making this a racial issue, – the majority rules… and they are not home, yet.

Update: 11:25AM See also : Library Chronicles “It’s about G8d d*mmed time”

Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal – It’s on today’s front page – link views actual paper.

Various Flickr Groups Photos
New Orleans
BloggingNewOrleans
louisiana
New Orleans Recovery
Hurricane Katrina
Defend New Orleans
Hurricane Katrina Photos – Pool
Humid City

Hey, mister…where’d ya get that gas?

July 27, 2007

Last month the Houston Chronicle printed a story on the plans being made to get gas to evacuating residents. I’m wondering given the absence of articles in daily Louisiana papers if there are any plans in local parishes along the hurricane evacuation routes to get generators to those gas stations that have gas during evacuations. Here are two stories on the issue that I’ve found on line. There are no others to date that I have found. Let me know if you have found other stories on the gas lines and shortage on the Louisiana Hurricane Evacuation routes from your local parishes.

Plan aims to get gas to evacuating residents -Houston Chronicle
June 24, 2007, 3:09PM
Oil industry helped Texas craft storm strategy
Plan aims to get more gas to evacuating masses
By TERRI LANGFORD
Copyright 2007 Houston Chronicle
3 stations are ready to pump
Hammond Daily Star Online – By Brennan David
Monday, July 9, 2007 11:09 AM CDT

“…Cashio’s Chevron and Quinn’s Texaco Service own generators in Hammond, as well as Harris Gas and Liquor in Ponchatoula – all three were open after the hurricane hit this area Aug. 29, 2005…

In fact, all three stores claim they were the first to start their generators to supply gas.

No other gas stations have come to own generators since Katrina.

Demand for gasoline was so high at the time that the City of Hammond approached Charles Cashio of Cashio’s Chevron about opening his store. Cashio did not own a generator at the time, but he was allowed to use a welding machine that could power the pumps…”

“…Gasoline was pumped throughout the day, supplying both public, private and government vehicles by all three providers.

“The city asked if we had gas in the tank,” Cashio said. “So they let me use a welding machine. The city needed the gas to clean the streets and clean things up. I had the gas and was willing to sell it. I just needed the power.”

Cashio said once the gas was pumping, the main obstacle was to not run out of gas. If emergency vehicles needed gas in the evening, he might not have any to give.

In the week after Katrina, Cashio said times were so busy that he was asking other gas stations to open their doors to lighten the load.

Across town at Quinn’s Texaco Service, owner Davey Quinn was also open for service after Katrina, and today has the capability to power all six pumps in the event of a power outage.

“We had people from Washington Parish that needed gas to milk their cows,” Quinn said. “I gave away a lot of free gas. Some people would drive up with nothing. I would fill them up and tell them to leave.”

Like the other two owners, Quinn said a supply truck would refill the station’s empty tank each day. Everyday for almost a week Quinn ran out of gasoline but would reopen once resupplied…”


KATRINA DAYS – Traffic backs up along West Thomas Street near Quinn’s Texaco Service in the days after Hurricane Katrina. Quinn’s is one of a few service stations in the area that has a generator to power gas pumps during extended power outages. Daily Star File Photo by Kari Wheeler

How fast can you hand-wheel out of the path of a 450mi wide issue?

July 24, 2007

Advocates decry lack of housing in New Orleans
High rents undermine aid extension, they say

“…HUD spokeswoman Donna White said 377 apartments are available, mostly at the Iberville complex. She said another 400 are being rehabilitated and should be available soon. Opening the doors to renters has been slow because the Housing Authority of New Orleans is required first to contact the former apartment residents to see whether they want to return…”

Of course, two years later most have HAD to MOVE on. FEMA rules indicate that if evacuees moved in with other family members they were not eligible for FEMA reimbursed housing assistance.

Poll: 1 in 3 would not evacuate for hurricane
Tuesday, July 24, 2007 1:50 AM EDT

“…Robert Blendon, the Harvard professor who directed the survey said he expected more people to say they would not evacuate after a mild 2006 Atlantic hurricane season.

“It just shows how people can become complacent if they’re not immediately threatened,” Blendon said.

In addition to finding that 31 percent of respondents would not evacuate, the study found another 5 percent said it would depend on the circumstances.

The poll was conducted by telephone and surveyed more than 5,000 people 18 or older in coastal areas in eight Southern states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Texas. All respondents lived within 20 miles of their state’s coastline. The poll was conducted between June 18 and July 10…”

States other than Louisiana and Mississippi during Katrina did not sustain a high number of fatalities. I believe, Alabama, had between one to three fatalities from hurricane Katrina in only one county – Washington – and that was on the highway. Most of the fatalities in Louisiana were due to drowning . . . 60-70% were elderly or infirm.

EDITORIAL: Katrina’s lessons lost
Tuesday, July 24, 2007

“…Residents of hurricane-prone areas shouldn’t have forgotten the hard lessons of Katrina so soon, but a new survey shows that people have dangerously short memories.

The Harvard School of Public Health surveyed residents of eight states beginning last month and found that 31 percent would not leave this year if the order came to evacuate. That’s up from 23 percent last year. ..”

FEMA available for questions on formaldehyde
Published: Monday, July 23, 2007 6:35 PM CDT

This site has the ability to post comments in addition to providing the 1-800# to call for questions.

Defense wants attorney general’s recusal in Hurricane Katrina nursing home deaths case
By MARY FOSTER, Associated Press Writer- ST. FRANCISVILLE, La. (AP)

“…A couple charged with negligent homicide in the deaths of 35 nursing home residents after Hurricane Katrina said Monday that they want the attorney general barred from prosecuting the case, citing a conflict of interest.

Defense counsel for Salvador and Mabel Mangano, owners of St. Rita’s nursing home, are expected to use evidence of alleged negligence against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the state of Louisiana and the government of St. Bernard Parish at trial.

But Attorney General Charles Foti also has filed a $200 billion claim against the Corps, contending faulty levees caused floods that inundated the New Orleans area, including St. Bernard Parish…”

Now why didn’t I think of using the levees as an excuse for poor emergency evacuation planning? It seems that everyone else is blaming the levees instead of having personal responsibility for evacuations. A Plan, you know, would be prudent and essential. Now why or how this facilities plan fell apart has become a “levee” issue in the courts. Yes, the levees failed, however, the evacuation plan indicates ….hello? …an EVACUATION PRIOR to …the levee failure…the storm…a serious problem…a singular negligent homicide…encountering a 450 mi wide storm.

I hope someone who advocates for the elderly, nursing homes, and those who are defenseless is paying attention to this case. This is infuriating!

More LQ’s rant on this from Newsvine.

National Guard deployment raises questions over storm preparedness – 09:36 PM CDT on Monday, July 23, 2007
Maya Rodriguez / Eyewitness News Reporter

We can’t say thank you enough to the military for their response during hurricane Katrina!

What were the comments related to LQ’s recent poll?

July 21, 2007

 

 

 

 

 

Please read, join Live Journal  la_questions community, and respond to the poll!    Poll Results

 

Blueeyedgroupie from the Baton Rouge community asked what was my agenda for the poll. I really have not put my “agenda” to print and so I typed up some quick thoughts as to my reasons for the poll. I’m not accustomed to making references to “agenda’s”! It sounds way too political!

I really didn’t think about the question as being included in an “agenda”, but I did have a few thoughts and ideas surrounding the poll. First of all I’ve read more than enough posts concerning Hurricane Katrina where people are blaming those who lived in low lying areas in New Orleans for not evacuating prior to the storm. I don’t recall seeing Greyhound buses or New Orleans buses on the hurricane route where I used to live fleeing the storm. I don’t believe that public transportation was available outside of New Orleans for those who did not want to ride out the storm. The River Parishes from recent news reports, if accurate, have cited that they are looking into a NEW public transportation system for that area. St. James Parish was recently cited in the New York Times as the home of a women living in a FEMA trailer, a former resident of New Orleans, without access to a nearby grocery store or childcare or public transportation. The Major media outlets do not get the full story. They only skim the surface and it is more than frustrating. There was no public transportation available where I used to live, either. This could also apply to the election, as there is one candidate who is attempting to be supportive of ending poverty. Hopefully, he meant in the United States and not some foreign country; although, I recognize that we, in the US, are rich in comparatively with many other countries of the world. Recovering from Katrina has been difficult for homeowners, however, the renting communities of the Gulf States – Mississippi and Louisiana – were left out of the equation with regards to the Road Home, FEMA, and other programs. I believe that housing issues prior to Katrina have been exacerbated by a slow recovery process. That’s about it as far as an “agenda” is concerned. I believe the demographics prior to Katrina spell out the disaster most accurately and offer an opportunity for community leaders to focus on providing opportunities at improving the support systems vital to recovery for the populations most affected and least recognized – the poor. Improvements in public transportation, healthcare, and affordable housing should become a focus for community leaders in the recovery process, but it is all wishful thinking until it is acted upon! I suppose that this is the “agenda” that has formed the idea of creating a “poll”. It’s just one of those things in my head and won’t remove itself until I act upon it in one form or another.

Please join la_questions community and help make this a successful poll. Thanks! LQ – Louisiana Questions

LQ’s poll on MSNBC NEWS links to Blogger

MSNBC US NEWS – LQ’s Poll

http://www.linkedin.com/answers/government-non-profit/charity-non-profit/GOV_CNP/68601-13753877
LinkedIn Answers to Poll

http://community.livejournal.com/storykatrina/
comments –

http://community.livejournal.com/poor_planning/
comments – As was Mississippi, don’t forget. As with many things, we were constantly battling each other for the coveted spot of #1 of the poorest state in the US.

They only recently passed us in “most corrupt”. Hurrah?

http://community.livejournal.com/nola_photos/
comments – It’s still Bush’s fault.

http://community.livejournal.com/fema_trailer/
comments – Mississippi isnt much better and rental price gouging is running rampant. As a disabled woman I have very little hope of finding a place anytime soon.

http://community.livejournal.com/da_parish/

comments – I didn’t KNOW it, but I suspected it.

I knew that some Louisiana parishes were among the poorest areas of the US, but I didn’t know that over 1/2 of them were in “persistent poverty.”

http://community.livejournal.com/batonrouge/
comments – No, but I’d believe it.

Sorry to sound like an ass, but it’s “parishes”, not “parish’s”. Gotta watch that.

What’s your agenda behind posting this question?

 

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