Archive for the 'LSU AG CENTER' Category

What happend two years later?

September 4, 2007

Two years ago on September 4th, 2005 we had no electricity. The streets were full of debris. It was hot. The trees lost all of their leaves. It looked like fall. Gunshots were fired a few blocks away. Two people were killed, “looting”. I was supposed to have surgery the day Katrina hit. That got cancelled. Red Cross was nowhere to be found, yet. Phone service was non-existant. Mail service was post poned. Grocery stores were taking cash only. Gas lines formed. The banks were closed. I didn’t see anything get any better in the following week ahead. Things just got worse.

After we finally evacuated, Louisiana said that the health insurance would carry over out of state. It didn’t. The pharmacy said that that the crisis was over now – a month later. It wasn’t. I had to fight the state for identification verification. FEMA mailed a letter to the wrong address and gave out several identification case numbers. It was a confusing mess. It took over nine months to get the SBA to respond. The SBA was a waste of my time. FEMA contracted employees, inspectors, were sent twice. This took months and months. FEMA can’t contact their contracted employees, either. They have no idea who is working on your case.

Two years later, I still haven’t had my surgery. Healthcare in Louisiana was really bad prior to Katrina. Now? I know its nearly non-existant. I still think of my children as 8 and 10, even though two years have passed. Now they have a sister. She was born nearly two years to the day of Katrina. She’s the only damn good thing that’s come out of this…aside from getting to evacuate alive.

UPDATE Sept. 5, 2007

CNN’s Ruins, deaths don’t stop family’s return – posts issues of the tourist industry capitalizing on Louisiana’s misfortune along with the USPS erasing addresses from their mail routes.  The comments are significant here as most agree the disaster tours are in bad taste.  Some of these come here people just don’t know any better.  Here are some comments on the CNN article.

AND two years later some organizations are just NOW attempting to contact me by mail.  These people suck.  They want a long application and review process in order to assist.  They can take a flying LEAP … the JERKS.  Two years?! Give me a break!

ITEMS FROM THE NEWS TWO YEARS LATER

New Orleans, two years later…
By d.K.(d.K.)
On Wednesday, August 29, it will have been two years since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast and caused the deluge that resulted in the worst natural (and, I’d argue, man-made) disaster in the history of this country. …
A Silent Cacophony – http://asilentcacophony.blogspot.com/

Two years after Katrina
By Molly Reid
NewhouseMiji Park sits back in a chair near a giant eraser board where she and her co-workers jot down their thoughts at The Idea Village in New Orleans. Post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans a beacon for entrepreneurs NEW ORLEANS — Five. …
Reports from The Birmingham News… – http://blog.al.com/bn/

Big Easy struggles 2 years after Katrina
Two years after Hurricane Katrina, much of the “city that care forgot” still lies in ruins. But Otis Biggs’ task as he shuffles his Tarot deck this moist August day is to peer into the future to 2015, the storm’s 10th anniversary. …
star-telegram.com: Breaking News – http://www.star-telegram.com/190/index.xml

Two Years Later…What have we learned from Hurricane Katrina?
By theexpositor
Newspapers this Sunday morning across the state of Mississippi are featuring stories measuring the effects of Hurricane Katrina two years after one of the most devastating disasters in American history. On my radio program, …
The Expositor – http://theexpositor.wordpress.com

Obama Outlines Plans for New Orleans
By rikyrah(The Angry Independent)
Strengthen the Levees: Two years after Katrina and despite a billion dollars spent to strengthen the levees, New Orleans is still not protected from a major storm. The levee rebuilding has been piecemeal and disorganized, …
http://mirroronamerica.blogspot.com/

Two years after Hurricane Katrina, a new lease — and view — on life
NEW YORK — Gulf Coast financial advisers are standing on higher ground two years after Hurricane Katrina devastated that region.
InvestmentNews Current Issue Headlines – http://www.investmentnews.com

Sense of optimism takes seed
By Mike Stuckey
A recent report from the Gulf Coast Business Council, titled “Two Years After Katrina,” paints a downright rosy picture on many economic issues, noting that annual retail sales in the three-county coastal area have increased 61 percent …
Rising from Ruin – http://risingfromruin.msnbc.com/

Two years after Katrina
Two years after Katrina, several churches in the Diocese of Mississippi still struggle to rebuild:. Driving along what is left of the beachfront boulevard in Bay St. Louis, one sees a lot of green. Nature has reinvented itself; …
The Lead – http://www.episcopalcafe.com/lead/

Most Huggable: Two Years After Katrina, Carbon Trading’s Dark Side …
Two years after Katrina, New Orleans is still struggling to revive itself. The Daily Green looks into the devastation that still pervades… SolFest rocks “the greenest show on Earth.” Eco Libris tracked down Stephen Morris for a …
TreeHugger – http://www.treehugger.com/

FULL REPORT: Two years after Katrina, blueprint for a failed recovery
By Chris Kromm(Bill)
The study also features “Where did the Katrina money go?” — an in-depth analysis of federal Katrina spending since 2005. The Institute reveals that, out of the $116 billion in Katrina funds allocated, less than 30% has gone towards …
Facing South – http://southernstudies.org/facingsouth/index.asp

New Orleans Two Years After Katrina:
By Orin Kerr
This Douglas Brinkley essay is a few days old but still a very important read. Here’s a taste:…
The Volokh Conspiracy – http://volokh.com/

Two Years After Katrina, Still Struggling With Healthcare
I’ve just returned from New Orleans where I visited Share Our Strength’s partners and friends to see firsthand the progress and challenges that the city faces two years after Hurricane Katrina. Having been to the city in February I …
Sharing Witness – http://www.sharingwitness.org/

Countdown: Two Years After Katrina
By Nicole Belle
Keith Olbermann and Newsweek’s Jonathan Alter look at the major thudding with which Bush’s quick jaunt to the Gulf Coast on the 2nd anniversary of Hurricane Katrina was received and the slow recovery process for Katrina victims.
Crooks and Liars – http://www.crooksandliars.com

Q&A: Operation Photo Rescue, Two Years After Katrina
As the Gulf Coast region marks the second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina this week, a photography group remains hard at work restoring family photographs damaged in the floods. Operation Photo Rescue is a network of volunteers who use …
Digg / Design / upcoming – http://digg.com/design

Two years after Katrina, New Orleans recovery stalls
NEW ORLEANS
| Two years after Hurricane Katrina almost nothing seems the same in New Orleans, but one thing has not changed — a cool regard by business for what was once a major Southern commercial center.
Business Feeds – http://www.datasystemsplus.net/

Two years after Katrina, an insurance nightmare
By bhounshell@ceip.org (Blake Hounshell)
Many people are probably wondering today why, two years after Katrina, New Orleans remains something a little less than a shining city on a hill. The news on the Big Easy’s recovery is not all bad, but it’s certainly disappointing for …
FP Passport – blogging on global… – http://blog.foreignpolicy.com

Bush: “Better days” Ahead Two Years After Katrina
President George W. Bush on Wednesday declared “better days” ahead for New Orleans despite complaints over slow rebuilding and amid lingering political fallout two years after Hurricane Katrina’s destruction. via 102.5 KIAK-FM.
US News – http://www.topix.com/us

New Orleans Residents Still Furious Two Years After Katrina
Not all residents of New Orleans are “furious”, but some of us are.
Digg / World News / upcoming – http://digg.com/world_news

Two Years After Katrina Entrepreneurs Return To New Orleans
By Jessica Stillman
Two Years After Katrina Entrepreneurs Return To New Orleans It’s two years today since Hurricane Katrina raged across the Gulf Coast, bursting levies and leaving large portions of New Orleans flooded. President Bush led a moment of …
BNET Intercom – http://blogs.bnet.com/intercom

Two Years After Katrina (The Leonard Lopate Show: Wednesday, 29
Rose’s columns that detail not just the city’s dislocation but his own. He joins Leonard to assess where New Orleans is two years after Katrina. If you want more info about ongoing relief efforts for Katrina victims, check out these …
WNYC New York Public Radio Most… – http://www.wnyc.org/

Two years after Katrina
By Sarah van Gelder(Sarah van Gelder)
There are way too many questions remaining two years after Katrina. An International Tribunal is meeting now in New Orleans to look for answers to why a moderate natural disaster became an unspeakable human tragedy that continues two …
Sarah van Gelder – http://www.yesmagazine.org/svgblog/

Two Years After Katrina: Race, Political Relavence, and Survival …
By mole333(mole333)
This diary was originally written once the lessons of Hurricane Katrina had sunk in a bit. This week is the second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Two years ag…I remember watching on the weather channel as a category 5 hurricane was …
Mole’s Progressive Democrat – http://moleprogressive.blogspot.com/

Two years after Katrina…
By Nikita
http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2007/news/katrina/ http://www2.oprah.com/tows/pastshows…omocode=cnnkat.
Comic Book Resources Forums – http://forums.comicbookresources.com

Building Back: Two Years after Katrina
After Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, many coastal Louisiana horse owners said “enough’s enough” and moved farther inland, while others stayed behind to reclaim their farms that were battered and drenched by the storm. …
TheHorse.com News – http://www.thehorse.com/

Two Years After Katrina
By Ryan
Tonight I was kicking around my place killing time before Canada battles Puerto Rico and I was amazed by an article that Alexander Wolff wrote called “Two Years After Katrina.” The article is phenomenal and makes it worth buying this …
HoopsAddict.com – http://hoopsaddict.com

NOLA: 2 years on article compilation
By hupcollective(hupcollective)
“Two years after Katrina, our nation has an opportunity to change course and demonstrate its sincere commitment to those being left behind in the faltering recovery,” says Sue Sturgis, a co-author of the full report. …
hupcollective – http://hupcollective.livejournal.com/

Hurricane Katrina: Two Years Later
By vjack(vjack)
Two years after Katrina, less than half of previous New Orleans residents have returned. Those who have remain concerned about the levees. There is a palpable and realistic fear that this could happen again. …
Atheist Revolution – http://atheistrevolution.blogspot.com/

Q&A: Operation Photo Rescue, Two Years After Katrina
As the Gulf Coast region marks the second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina this week, a photography group remains hard at work restoring family photographs damaged in the floods. via Photo District News.
Photography News – http://www.topix.com/arts/photography

New Orleans, Drop Dead (two years after katrina and thousands are ...
By angryindian
New Orleans, Drop Dead (two years after katrina and thousands are still without homes_new. I guess I’m really a hard-hearted person, but as a survivor of Florida’s Hurricane Charley, which tore my roof off and forced me to spend many …
The News is NowPublic.com – NowPublic… – http://www.nowpublic.com

After Katrina, and after Hugo, and after Andrew…
By Fausta(Fausta)
Two years after Andrew hit journalists weren’t going to Florida to interview people whose rent was still being paid by FEMA. Interestingly, a large influx of illegal labor went to work in the rebuilding effort after Andrew, Hugo, …
Fausta’s blog – http://faustasblog.com/

Two Years After Katrina, Billions in Relief Funds Are Missing
By bubba2
Less than 42% of the money set aside has even been spent, much less gotten to those most in need. Channel: Do No Evil Tags: hurricane Katrina Gulf Coast long term recovery missing relief funds Bush.
Netscape.com Do No Evil Stories – http://www.netscape.com

Kinship Circle: [GULF COAST] Two Years And Still Counting
By Kelly
Unbelievably, nearly two months after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, animals are still being found in houses. (November 2005). Kinship Circle – 2007-09-01 – 07 – Don Corsmeier of KAT 5. PHOTO: Rescue volunteer Don Corsmeier rides in …
easyVegan.info – http://www.easyvegan.info

New Orleans: Two Years After Hurricane Katrina
It’s now been two years since the destruction of New Orleans caused by defective flood protection built by the US Army Corps of Engineers following Hurricane Katrina. Check out the video of the “progress.”
Digg / upcoming – http://digg.com/

KATRINA
By Ann
-One year after the disaster there were still approximately 100000 people still living in more than 38000 FEMA-provided trailers. Two years ago, Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. In the days following the …
BEAUTIFUL, ALSO, ARE THE SOULS… – http://kathmanduk2.wordpress.com

Two years after Katrina, New Orleans job recovery stalls
Two years after Hurricane Katrina almost nothing seems the same in New Orleans, but one thing has not changed – a cool regard by business for what was once a major Southern commercial center.
http://www.LoHud.com

Hurricane Felix: The 8th Category 5 Atlantic Storm in Just 5 Years
By Dan
There have now been eight Category 5 Atlantic hurricanes in the past five years (Isabel, Ivan, Emily, Katrina, Rita, Wilma, Dean, Felix); There have been two Atlantic Category 5s so far this year; only three other seasons have had more …
The Daily Green – http://www.thedailygreen.com

Racism and Criminal Justice in New Orleans
By jodietonita
Two Years Post-Katrina: Racism and Criminal Justice in New Orleans By Jordan Flaherty August 29, 2007. Two years after the devastation of New Orleans highlighted racism and inequality in the US, the disaster continues. …
She muses – http://shemuses.net

MediaStorm: Finding the Way Home: Two Years After Katrina by …
MediaStorm: Finding the Way Home: Two Years After Katrina
by Brenda Ann Kenneally.
While Seated (2point8 linklog) – http://whileseated.tumblr.com/

FROM NY TIMES:
But two years after Hurricane Katrina hit, Ms. Cassin and her husband, Joseph, are still stranded far from home; their insurer has offered them just $41000. Emile J. Labat III, a funeral home owner and real estate investor, …
http://defendneworleans.tumblr.com/

Katrina and New Orleans Demographics
By johnibii
Two years after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina we have an opportunity to look at how the victims and displaced responded in a crisis. A Vietnamese-American friend who lives in New Orleans said to me: “Mother fled North Vietnam …
Peace and Freedom II – http://johnibii.wordpress.com

Why would I buy all that if I wasn’t fixing it?

August 9, 2007

I understood that New Orleans and Louisiana, in general, had affordable housing issues prior to Katrina. Unsightly housing, or blighted housing has affected many in Louisiana. I’ve seen the old barge board, shot gun homes that people are actually living in today. I’ve walked through them before they were scheduled to be demolished. I’ve seen these places all over Louisiana. People need a place to call home, a place to live, and work, and rear their children. Regardless, of the substandard housing…they pay their rent and work and play like everyone else. Sure they complain to the landlords about the structural problems of their home. All of these landlords have one excuse or another as to why they never fixed the leaky roof, the plumbing, or the stove. The rent was cheap and so possibly some tenants did not complain. They were thankful for a place to live. The issues in New Orleans post Katrina are not new, unfortunately. It appears, as far as affordable housing is concerned, that they were only, and I use that term loosely and with sarcastic undertones, exacerbated after the disaster.

Some parishes, cities, or towns, have housing inspectors and some do not. Not everyone affected by Katrina lived in either Baton Rouge or New Orleans. It is an overlooked and under-exploited fact. Most of the inspection issues are applied both at the town, city, or parish level and require little else but an ordinance and the staff to conduct the inspections. Of course, the fees for the inspections are likely the responsibility of landowners. Inspections are just another financial issue for the homeowner/ landlord to deal with that they may not be able to afford.

The post office in the year since Katrina (now two years) had issues in delivering mail to the appropriate person(s) due to the mail forwarding time limits, names, families, etc. For those of you familiar with the postal services’ rules and regulations with regards to forwarding – you understand. I’ve sent letters off in the mail to Katrina damaged neighborhoods only to find the letter back inside my mailbox several weeks to a month later. I’ve had to call local Post Masters in order to verify addresses and tell them how silly they are being, all the while knowing that these people still live at the address I’ve listed, but I have received the letter stamped, “forward expired”.

The WAFB article dated June 2007 states that the city of Baton Rouge gave her six months in order to respond. The article was written in June, and said that the woman was given notice in August of 2006. The home was not damaged by Katrina according to the article, but was damaged by a fire after Katrina in the summer of 2006. The journalist was quick to point out that the original owner of the home, was dead, but did not go into detail. Assuming that the daughter kept her maiden name, which is a large assumption, there are a number of “Davis'” on the Katrina Victim list.

Did the journalist provide pertinent and adequate detail? “Woman Upset the City of Baton Rouge Bulldozed Her Home”.

Bill Crider’s Pop Culture Magazine points out, “We’re here from the government, we’re here to help you.” August 6, 2007 A story from the Ninth Ward’s Jason Banks on KSAT San Antonio, Texas news online.

No One Knows Why Family’s Home Torn Down – Local News Story – KSAT San Antonio: “NEW ORLEANS — Jason Banks got his trash hauled away, obtained a building permit, gutted his Ninth Ward home and was ready to renovate.

But then, the brick house vanished, reduced to a slab in an unwanted demolition.

‘I was heartbroken. I was in tears. I was furious,’ he said.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency said orders to tear down the house came from City Hall — but no one in City Hall is answering questions about Banks’ home.

‘They don’t know why. It happened it wasn’t on the blighted list. The last call I made yesterday, they told me FEMA did it. Then, a guy called me back from FEMA and said they’re not in the business if tearing down homes,’ Banks said.

Jason Banks said he kept his grass cut, paid his taxes and had the home appraised at $147,000. He was just waiting on money from Louisiana Road Home rebuilding program to make repairs to his house.”

And still more housing demolition articles gathered from The Truth Laid Bear.

Map with housing scheduled to be demolished in and around New Orleans. Disregard some misinformed, un-educated commentors who believe the map is a “propaganda” tool. The housing crisis before Katrina was too obvious to those who attempted to solve the problem. . . I wish it were all just propaganda! Internet maps are kewl and their display (ie linked icons – pins, circles, etc. ) oftentimes must be sized largely to create the internet link. Some of the comments here reflect extreme ignorance to both internet map making, and housing issues. Karen, listed below, also has a map of her photographed homes on the chopping block.

Still there are people who believe the housing crisis and issues in New Orleans are exclusive to the “African American” community. I have to give them credit for their media coverage, but I also have to interject that the short sighted focus on larger cities, and racial prejudice is getting into muddy water. Everyone deserves a place to call home – is my point exclusively. Others choose to make housing in New Orleans a racial issue. They can. It is their right. However wrong I feel about making this a racial issue, – the majority rules… and they are not home, yet.

Update: 11:25AM See also : Library Chronicles “It’s about G8d d*mmed time”

Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal – It’s on today’s front page – link views actual paper.

Various Flickr Groups Photos
New Orleans
BloggingNewOrleans
louisiana
New Orleans Recovery
Hurricane Katrina
Defend New Orleans
Hurricane Katrina Photos – Pool
Humid City

Who is fighting poverty in Louisiana? Anonymous “stakeholders and community organizers” .

July 31, 2007

The Advocate printed an Opinion article, “Fighting Poverty in Louisiana”,  on how Louisiana is addressing its poverty issues.  It lacked depth.  First of all, its goals from 2004 are out of date.  Secondly, it states that there are “stakeholders” in all 64 parishes addressing the “problems” in their communities.  Lies, lies, and more lies. If they had published the names of these so called “stakeholders and community organizers” I’m sure the local OFS DSS offices would have distributed the information.  This is the first I’ve ever heard of the SToP Movement from DSS.  It’s a crock of bull designed to assist DSS employees in making themselves feel like they have made a difference.  The social workers before Katrina, from what some have said, had an overwhelming case load.  Like I’ve stated.  If there is still such an organization – it isn’t organized.  The article also mentioned the American Community Survey from the Census.  There will be, from what I can see from their website, a release of information in August and September 2007.  The information is based on populations 65,000+.  Now that leaves out rural areas, doesn’t it? Especially with populations under Census guidelines of 65,000+.   Good grief!  LSU AG Center defined this as “persistent poverty” and identified its sources.  It didn’t define those areas of populations at or above 65,000+ as 20% of Louisiana.  Sure, that 65,000+ slice has a 20% poverty rate.  This information leaves out rural areas of under 65,000 as in every rural community in Louisiana.

I dig statistics and information sourcing, but I don’t dig half baked articles making claims at a FIGHT!

“Fighting Poverty in Louisiana” published July 31, 2007, The Advocate, Opinion

Acting together as concerned citizens, we will address a chronic problem that is more pressing now than ever before. This problem affects hundreds of thousands of Louisiana families, costs uncounted millions of dollars, destroys our children’s potential and tarnishes our state’s image. This problem is  poverty.

According to the 2005 American Community Survey, approximately 864,277 Louisianians, or about 20 percent of the state’s population, live in poverty. Through a one-of-its-kind movement joining grass-roots stakeholders with state and federal partners, Solutions to Poverty is making strides in alleviating poverty in Louisiana, and we need people’s help.

During the birth of the Solutions to Poverty movement in 2004, education was identified as the No. 1 solution. We are grateful to Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco for her commitment to education and the $700 million new budget investment, especially $30 million for pre-kindergarten.

In other legislation backed by SToP, the governor recently signed into law two powerful new tools for fighting poverty in Louisiana: a School Readiness Tax Credit for quality child care and a state Earned Income Tax Credit for the working poor.

The SToP movement, led by the Department of Social Services’ Office of Family Support, has created a statewide network of programs to help our fragile families achieve self-sufficiency. More than 10,000 Louisiana citizens have signed up so far to participate in this three-pronged effort:

    * Community: Grass-roots stakeholders in all 64 parishes seek to identify and own solutions.

    * Policy: These groups create initiatives and suggest program improvements that enhance quality of life.

    * Legislation: Community organizers are mobilized into lobbyists for legislation that helps citizens move from poverty into self-sufficiency.

SToP solutions include promotion and implementation of the following program components: the state and federal Earned Income Tax Credit, the School Readiness Tax Credit, the Individual Development Account program, the Quality Rating System, the Microenterprise Development program, the Head Start Collaboration project, the Children’s Defense Fund Freedom Schools and the Teen Pregnancy Prevention initiative.

Poverty affects all of us, and everyone can be part of the solution. To join the grass-roots effort to eradicate poverty in Louisiana, contact OFS staffer Kim Lacour at (225) 342-6030.


Adren Wilson, Assistant Secretary
Office of Family Support
Department of Social Services
Baton Rouge

If you have questions or comments about the American Community Survey, please call (888)346-9682 or e-mail cmo.acs@census.gov.

Links from The Advocate
http://www.gov.state.la.us/
http://www.crt.state.la.us/ltgovernor/
http://www.legis.state.la.us/
http://www.ag.state.la.us/
http://www.sos.louisiana.gov/
http://www.ldaf.state.la.us/
http://www.dps.louisiana.gov/dpsweb.nsf/

http://www.dotd.state.la.us/

Who dat ? Say it isn’t so…

July 29, 2007

Louisiana CrawfishAshley Morris offered links to the new Saints website developed by a Seattle, Washington consulting company.  Ashley was unimpressed with  the fact that the Saints didn’t “buy local”. They are our home team.  They should buy local. The Saints made me proud last year for the first time since the 80’s. Morris was right on that note. “Unimpressed”, wasn’t the word that first came to my mind.  Negligent, ignorant, selfish, foolish, corporate…buffoons!  I have a string of expletives I can’t share.

The buy local buy Louisiana campaign has long since been thrown under the radar and should be front page news daily.  The fact that most of the revenue base has been shipped to Texas ie evacuated and likely will never return is a sore spot for many of us. You can view the pdf file from the left about Houston area evacuees for those numbers.  Ashley rants further about the fact that a woman from Texas held a sign up during Mardi Gras, “We’re from Texas – You owe us!”  I have another string of expletives…

Someone should give at least a verbal credit to all of those companies that buy Louisiana products.  A journalist from Washington State wrote a story recently on sodas that use pure cane sugar.  A photo of Zatarain’s Rootbeer accompanied the article.  Zatarian’s  Rootbeer isn’t available on the West Coast.  There were addresses and phone numbers of local Washington State merchants  who offered various brands of home made soda products.  Of course, none of the merchants called had even heard of Zatarains rootbeer.  The author of the article would not return phone calls.  I was livid.  Zatarain’s, now a division of McCormick, stated to the effect that this was a “snafu” of sorts.  They were not informed of the use of the photograph and should have been. Here’s where I got ugly…

I’m reminded of the lack of milk during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and being surrounded by dairy country.  My recent post on the gas shortage lifted me somewhat as a Hammond area gas station offered free gas to a dairy farmer who needed it to milk his cows.  Buying local milk, however, is a bit more difficult considering the dairy industry.  Every container of milk you buy from Winn Dixie has a Jacksonville, Fla stamp.  You just can’t buy local milk!  It all gets thrown into one great big vat and shipped around.

Agriculture Hearings April 2007 – local dairy farmer speaks an talks about Katrina’s impact and current issues pertaining to the Louisiana dairy industry April 2007.

“…It is important for the Committee to note that Louisiana is a milk deficit state which means that we do not produce enough fluid milk to satisfy consumer needs and consequently milk from other states has to be shipped in at various times to meet demand. Maintaining as much milk production as possible from the existing dairy operations in the state is critical!…”

Press Release July 27, 2007 La. Dept. of Ag 

It’s frustrating to go into the stores and see Chinese shrimp for sale knowing that Louisiana Shrimpers are out there working for Louisiana in the Gulf.  I can’t find one Made with Pride in Post Katrina Louisiana sticker.

Here are two links for Louisiana food products. Cajun Shop  and   Louisiana Seafood .  And this is from the Louisiana Department of Agriculture Marketing.   Then there’s the export directory of Louisiana Products. This export list is from August 2005.  I’m not certain if it is accurate reflection post Katrina.  It will take some work to find out. The Ag website doesn’t give a specific date that i can immediately see, just “August 2005”.   The Ag website does have a 2007 list of Louisiana Food and Non-Food Products. I can’t download those to review right away — this post Katrina dialup puter is so slow. So check them out at your own leisure.

What were the comments related to LQ’s recent poll?

July 21, 2007

 

 

 

 

 

Please read, join Live Journal  la_questions community, and respond to the poll!    Poll Results

 

Blueeyedgroupie from the Baton Rouge community asked what was my agenda for the poll. I really have not put my “agenda” to print and so I typed up some quick thoughts as to my reasons for the poll. I’m not accustomed to making references to “agenda’s”! It sounds way too political!

I really didn’t think about the question as being included in an “agenda”, but I did have a few thoughts and ideas surrounding the poll. First of all I’ve read more than enough posts concerning Hurricane Katrina where people are blaming those who lived in low lying areas in New Orleans for not evacuating prior to the storm. I don’t recall seeing Greyhound buses or New Orleans buses on the hurricane route where I used to live fleeing the storm. I don’t believe that public transportation was available outside of New Orleans for those who did not want to ride out the storm. The River Parishes from recent news reports, if accurate, have cited that they are looking into a NEW public transportation system for that area. St. James Parish was recently cited in the New York Times as the home of a women living in a FEMA trailer, a former resident of New Orleans, without access to a nearby grocery store or childcare or public transportation. The Major media outlets do not get the full story. They only skim the surface and it is more than frustrating. There was no public transportation available where I used to live, either. This could also apply to the election, as there is one candidate who is attempting to be supportive of ending poverty. Hopefully, he meant in the United States and not some foreign country; although, I recognize that we, in the US, are rich in comparatively with many other countries of the world. Recovering from Katrina has been difficult for homeowners, however, the renting communities of the Gulf States – Mississippi and Louisiana – were left out of the equation with regards to the Road Home, FEMA, and other programs. I believe that housing issues prior to Katrina have been exacerbated by a slow recovery process. That’s about it as far as an “agenda” is concerned. I believe the demographics prior to Katrina spell out the disaster most accurately and offer an opportunity for community leaders to focus on providing opportunities at improving the support systems vital to recovery for the populations most affected and least recognized – the poor. Improvements in public transportation, healthcare, and affordable housing should become a focus for community leaders in the recovery process, but it is all wishful thinking until it is acted upon! I suppose that this is the “agenda” that has formed the idea of creating a “poll”. It’s just one of those things in my head and won’t remove itself until I act upon it in one form or another.

Please join la_questions community and help make this a successful poll. Thanks! LQ – Louisiana Questions

LQ’s poll on MSNBC NEWS links to Blogger

MSNBC US NEWS – LQ’s Poll

http://www.linkedin.com/answers/government-non-profit/charity-non-profit/GOV_CNP/68601-13753877
LinkedIn Answers to Poll

http://community.livejournal.com/storykatrina/
comments –

http://community.livejournal.com/poor_planning/
comments – As was Mississippi, don’t forget. As with many things, we were constantly battling each other for the coveted spot of #1 of the poorest state in the US.

They only recently passed us in “most corrupt”. Hurrah?

http://community.livejournal.com/nola_photos/
comments – It’s still Bush’s fault.

http://community.livejournal.com/fema_trailer/
comments – Mississippi isnt much better and rental price gouging is running rampant. As a disabled woman I have very little hope of finding a place anytime soon.

http://community.livejournal.com/da_parish/

comments – I didn’t KNOW it, but I suspected it.

I knew that some Louisiana parishes were among the poorest areas of the US, but I didn’t know that over 1/2 of them were in “persistent poverty.”

http://community.livejournal.com/batonrouge/
comments – No, but I’d believe it.

Sorry to sound like an ass, but it’s “parishes”, not “parish’s”. Gotta watch that.

What’s your agenda behind posting this question?

 

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Why is FEMA Still a Four Letter Word?

July 20, 2007

Since when does a state of emergency in a National Disaster require bids to get out of my driveway?

Daily Kos

FEMA is still a 4-letter word here.

Sat Jul 14, 2007 at 06:21:34 PM PDT

Daily Kingfish

…Lord knows Louisiana needs it…

FEMA’s Still a Four-Letter Word

by: gildareed

Sat Jul 14, 2007 at 23:16:02 PM CDT

(This is the first post on DKF for Gilda Werner Reed, an amazing woman running to knock off Rep. “Bobby” Jindal in LA-01. – promoted by ryan)Cross-posted over at Daily Kos.