Archive for the 'generators' Category

Why did Gov. Jindal bring up Katrina?

February 26, 2009

KIRO Talk Radio attempted to make fun of Gov. Bobby Jindal’s speech yesterday evening. That part of the radio show was a success. Here is where KIRO talk radio invited chaos...they discredited Sheriff Harry Lee and they made fun of HURRICANE KATRINA victims and survivors by questioning , “Why did Bobby Jindal bring up Hurricane Katrina, again in his speech? What does Katrina have to do with it?”

I started crying inside. I wish that I had a cell phone handy at the time of the show when they said that they were taking calls and opened a discussion. I was busy at the time and couldn’t. They should be very, very, thankful that I didn’t call.

“As the president made clear this evening, we’re now in a time of challenge. Many of you listening tonight have lost jobs; others have seen your college and your retirement savings dwindle. Many of you are worried about losing your health care and your homes. You’re looking to your elected leaders in Washington for solutions.” –Bobby Jindal

Here is what KIRO didn’t understand. People lost their jobs, their transportation, their homes, their lives, and everything about their lives changed … INSTANTLY during Hurricane Katrina. Many are still fighting insurance companies, even today. Many are still rebuilding. Many cannot rebuild. Many are still not home. Many are still fighting bureaucrats.

When Mt. St. Helens blew, 50 people died. I didn’t hear KIRO making fun of that natural disaster. Hurricane Katrina killed three times that number of people. Some of those were children. No children died when Mt. St. Helens blew.

KIRO Talk Radio discredited Sheriff Harry Lee and laughed about the fact that he has since passed on. “We’re trying to….get….let’s call him.” they said. They actually wanted to call Harry Lee and confirm the conversation that he had had with Jindal during Hurricane Katrina. Then KIRO realized that Harry Lee was dead. KIRO doesn’t understand how well liked and well respected Sheriff Harry Lee was and still is in Louisiana. KIRO Talk Radio screwed up. Maybe if Harry had better health care he would still be here today. Many people in Louisiana didn’t have access to health care prior to Hurricane Katrina as Louisiana was one of those states that was deemed a “healthcare shortage area.” I can’t expect KIRO to understand what that means after Katrina.

“We’re grateful for the support we’ve received from across the nation for our ongoing recovery efforts.” KIRO Talk Radio wasn’t listening. And for those of us who cannot “go home” and are forced to listen to KIRO instead of WWL? It is because people “ignored the bureaucrats” that “There’s a lesson in this experience: The strength of America is not found in our government. It is found in the compassionate hearts and the enterprising spirit of our citizens.”

Making fun of Jindals diction, tone, and meter in his speech was okay with me.

Making fun of Bobby Jinda’s RED WHITE AND BLUE TIE, was even okay with me. (Even though I’d like to wrap it around KIRO TALK RADIO’s NECK.) The fact that Bobby Jindal has ALWAYS worn a RED WHITE AND BLUE TIE, escaped KIRO listeners and KIRO Talk Radio.

Making fun of Hurricane Katrina victims and the travesty that REMAINS WITH US DAILY by KIRO TALK RADIO PERSONALITIES asking, “Why did Bobby Jindal bring up Hurricane Katrina, again?” shows complete and total, utter disregard, disrespect, ignorance, and poor taste in broadcast journalism. I can go on and on. I won’t. KIRO Talk Radio, like many other Americans, unfortunately, have no inkling.

The current so called “financial crisis” that America is facing cannot be compared to anything else but Katrina. The banks closed after Katrina. There was no cash to be had, no credit, NOTHING. KIRO couldn’t put up a radio station from scratch, I’d be willing to bet on it.

I’d like to see WWL interview these KIRO Talk Radio folks. I’d like to see KIRO get GRILLED.

I’ll show you mine cowboy, if you show me yours. (I think I already know who won this fight.)

KIRO,? You’re FIRED.

Why are they still missing after Hurricane Katrina?

August 18, 2007

I’ve said it before…Katrina didn’t discriminate.  The following report indicates that the poor and the elderly were primarily impacted.  No Kidding.  It took a team of  Doctors and their data to prove that?  All of the hubbub about race playing a role in the aftermath of the disaster infuriates me.   Katrina didn’t discriminate. FEMA wasn’t discriminatory.  It was the leadership at the parish and state level that failed – not just at the time, but has been failing for years.

The news lately about the Recovery School District in New Orleans is a typical example of failure.  Over 17,000 dollars are being given to teachers who decide to come to this district.  Yes, the teachers are needed. No, I don’t think they understand the problems with the New Orleans School Systems existed prior to Katrina.  22 million dollars, for example, went missing….Teachers who didn’t work in the district any longer were being paid!  The measley 17,000 dollars they are being offered is a nice incentive.  I’m just skeptical of the offer. They might be paying for it in the end.

Read further for the complete excerpt of the Katrina related deaths and how the statistics tell the true story of the poor and elderly in Louisiana.  What’s been said about the ICMP and identification of remains and review previous posts on the issue.

Findings On Katrina-Related New Orleans Mortality Data

“Dana Troxclair, MD, Instructor of Pathology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, will present mortality data on Louisiana storm victims at a poster presentation at the 2007 Gulf Coast Post-Katrina Forum of the Gulf States Alliance on August 20, 2007 from 9:45 – 10:15 a.m., 2:45 – 3:15 p.m. and 4:30- 6:00 p.m. at the Beau Rivage Hotel in Biloxi, MS. The research team also included Drs. Robin McGoey, Gary Lipscomb, Richard Tracy, and William Newman, all of the Department of Pathology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans (LSUHSCNO). Drs. Troxclair, Tracy and Newman were among the LSUHSCNO forensic pathologists who performed autopsies on bodies found during rescue and recovery missions following Katrina.

LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans pathologists were responsible for performing more than 820 autopsies on recovered Louisiana victims and report that autopsy findings comprised the single most successful identification technique.

According to the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, 1,464 Louisiana residents perished as a result of Hurricane Katrina and the flooding resulting from failed levees. Of those, 910 victims were examined and identified at two Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team (DMORT) locations.

The LSUHSCNO pathologists were tasked with conducting post-mortem examinations for the primary purpose of identification of the dead. Examinations included field case notes, personal effects, fingerprints, dental, x-ray and autopsy findings, DNA, and anthropology. Nine hundred ten post-mortem files including more than 1,000 dental charts and 30,000+ images have been compiled and stored digitally. Pre-Katrina US Census data on Orleans Parish were analyzed for comparison.

Ninety-six percent of deaths were storm-related and 97% of individuals were positively identified. Twenty-eight percent were identified using autopsy findings-the technique that yielded the highest number of positive ids.

The latest mortality data found that 75% of victims were residents of Orleans parish with 64% older than 65 years of age. The racial distribution was: 56% African-American, 40% Caucasian, 4% Asian, 4% Native American, and 2% Hispanic. For comparison, the pre-storm published Census data concluded that only 12% of the Orleans parish population was older than 65 years of age with a racial distribution as follows: 68% African-American, 29% Caucasian, 3% Hispanic, 2% Asian, and 0.2% Native American. Twenty-six percent of families were below the national poverty line.

The researchers conclude that when final hurricane mortality data is compared to pre-storm Census data, the belief that the hurricane disproportionately destroyed any one race is not substantiated. In fact, deaths among Caucasian, Asian and Native Americans were all overrepresented; while the African-American and Hispanic populations were less impacted. Under appreciated is the fact that our elderly and poor populations, regardless of race, were the most devastated.

“We present that a lesson learned is about those left behind due to lack of physical or financial means,” notes Dr. Troxclair. “Furthermore, based on the remarkable success of the autopsy as a means of human identification, we emphasize its paramount importance as a component of a nation’s response to mass disasters. However, with 135 Louisiana residents still categorized as missing, and 23 human remains yet to be identified, the final impact of the storm remains uncertain.”

There is nothing in this story about the ICMP and the Louisiana Department of Health contracting with them to identify remains. There has been no email to date since the ICMP was questioned if they are still working on identification. Search ICMP on Louisiana Questions for more posts of this story.

From previous post…

Louisiana Questions if the ICMP is still in charge of making those identifications as declared by their 29 December 2005 news release. The news release can be found at the ICMP website. See: Beyond Katrina, ICMP , CNN , Associated Press,

Let nothing be forgotten in this place

Katrina victim’s memorial taken down.

RIP VERA

On Dean

“…Times like this, I can see that the post-traumatic stress disorder is far from post and more a way of life than a disorder.” — G – Bitch comments on Gentilly Girl

Ain’t DIS Fun? – posted by Craig Giesecke at 6:11 PM on August 17, 2007

“…That time of year again, when we pay more attention to what’s going on tropicalwise and try to prognoticate what the hell is going to happen. As a Gulf Coast resident for 25 years (and a Gulf State resident for nearly 50) it’s just part of What We Do.”

“…That said, it’s all just educated speculation for now. Do they take bets on this kinda thing over at Harrah’s?

Dean Expected To Reach The Gulf Wednesday As Category 4 Hurricane
Moreover Technologies – Louisiana news Aug 17 12:06
FortBendNow Aug 17 2007 2:41PM GMT

NOAA Dean

Is Louisiana Prepared if a Storm Comes Our Way?

More News from Humid City
Rising Tide II: Guest Post by Dangerblonde

Hey, mister…where’d ya get that gas?

July 27, 2007

Last month the Houston Chronicle printed a story on the plans being made to get gas to evacuating residents. I’m wondering given the absence of articles in daily Louisiana papers if there are any plans in local parishes along the hurricane evacuation routes to get generators to those gas stations that have gas during evacuations. Here are two stories on the issue that I’ve found on line. There are no others to date that I have found. Let me know if you have found other stories on the gas lines and shortage on the Louisiana Hurricane Evacuation routes from your local parishes.

Plan aims to get gas to evacuating residents -Houston Chronicle
June 24, 2007, 3:09PM
Oil industry helped Texas craft storm strategy
Plan aims to get more gas to evacuating masses
By TERRI LANGFORD
Copyright 2007 Houston Chronicle
3 stations are ready to pump
Hammond Daily Star Online – By Brennan David
Monday, July 9, 2007 11:09 AM CDT

“…Cashio’s Chevron and Quinn’s Texaco Service own generators in Hammond, as well as Harris Gas and Liquor in Ponchatoula – all three were open after the hurricane hit this area Aug. 29, 2005…

In fact, all three stores claim they were the first to start their generators to supply gas.

No other gas stations have come to own generators since Katrina.

Demand for gasoline was so high at the time that the City of Hammond approached Charles Cashio of Cashio’s Chevron about opening his store. Cashio did not own a generator at the time, but he was allowed to use a welding machine that could power the pumps…”

“…Gasoline was pumped throughout the day, supplying both public, private and government vehicles by all three providers.

“The city asked if we had gas in the tank,” Cashio said. “So they let me use a welding machine. The city needed the gas to clean the streets and clean things up. I had the gas and was willing to sell it. I just needed the power.”

Cashio said once the gas was pumping, the main obstacle was to not run out of gas. If emergency vehicles needed gas in the evening, he might not have any to give.

In the week after Katrina, Cashio said times were so busy that he was asking other gas stations to open their doors to lighten the load.

Across town at Quinn’s Texaco Service, owner Davey Quinn was also open for service after Katrina, and today has the capability to power all six pumps in the event of a power outage.

“We had people from Washington Parish that needed gas to milk their cows,” Quinn said. “I gave away a lot of free gas. Some people would drive up with nothing. I would fill them up and tell them to leave.”

Like the other two owners, Quinn said a supply truck would refill the station’s empty tank each day. Everyday for almost a week Quinn ran out of gasoline but would reopen once resupplied…”


KATRINA DAYS – Traffic backs up along West Thomas Street near Quinn’s Texaco Service in the days after Hurricane Katrina. Quinn’s is one of a few service stations in the area that has a generator to power gas pumps during extended power outages. Daily Star File Photo by Kari Wheeler