Archive for August, 2008

Text alerts from NOAA less is more and lessons learned

August 31, 2008

The site declares that it is an experimental weather alert service for your mobile device. http://www.srh.noaa.gov/cte.htm Lessons learned from Katrina and press releases from the GSM World News indicate an increased usage of cell phones. What the NOAA website offers is wonderful, however, not all cell phones will be able to view alerts. Those cell phones with text only access and no web access will not be able to receive alerts. It leaves out the “little guy” who does not have a major cell phone carrier. You can read more about the 2005 report from GSM World News here http://www.gsmworld.com/news/press_2005/press05_36.shtml .

Today is the last day of the NWS web services via wireless technology poll:
http://www.weather.gov/survey/nws-survey.php?code=cell

I know of only one website that offers to send an SMS for free via the internet. Of course, sometimes when phones do not work, your DSL or cable might. This is all pending you have electricity and a computer, of course. http://www.txtdrop.com can deliver a text message via the internet.

If I’m wrong, let me know. This may be helpful.

NOAA Poll
http://www.weather.gov/survey/nws-survey.php?code=cell

Free Text Message via the internet
http://www.txtdrop.com

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Where are the FEMA trailers in Louisiana?

August 31, 2008

From Tri-Parish Times

Trailers from Katrina remain

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Nearly 10,000 federally issued trailers and mobile homes remain in Louisiana nearly three years after Hurricane Katrina _ and with attention now on Gustav.

Of those, about 2,880 remain in New Orleans, most in front of homes people are trying to rebuild following Katrina.

As of Wednesday, more than 1,000 remained in each St. Bernard, St. Tammany and Calcasieu parishes, according to figures released by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. St. Bernard was virtually wiped out by Katrina; Calcasieu was hit by Hurricane Rita, in September 2005.

Latest update: Aug 29, 2008 – 08:16:28 am PDT

What is MRC?

August 31, 2008

Technical issues on LAVA August 31, 2008

From LAVA website, click register now, click Download Responder Guide comes up ZIPPO – return to front page register.

From May 2008 PDF on LAVA

https://www.lava.dhh.louisiana.gov/la/LAVA_May.pdf

MRC Units in Louisiana are community-based and function as a way to locally organize and utilize volunteers who want to donate their time and expertise to prepare for and respond to emergencies and promotes healthy living throughout the year. MRC Units are provided specific areas to target that strengthen the public health infrastructure of their communities. Please help support your local MRC unit in strengthening the public health infrastructure in Louisiana by volunteering. MRC volunteers supplement existing emergency and public health resources. MRC volunteers include medical and public health professionals such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, veterinarians, and epidemiologists. Many community members-interpreters, chaplains, office workers, legal advisors, and others-can fill key support positions. As we approach hurricane season, please contact your
local MRC for additional information about how you can volunteer in your community.

Acadiana Medical Reserve Corps (AMRC)
Post Office Box 60488
Lafayette, LA 70592
Dr. Andy Blalock
337-852-8771
Calcasieu Medical Reserve Corps
Lake Charles, LA 70601
Angela Jouett
337-475-3217
City of Baton Rouge, Parish of East Baton
Rouge
3773 Harding Blvd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70807
MRC Coordinator
225-389-2100
Jefferson Parish Medical Reserve Corps
1887 Ames Blvd
Marrero, LA 70072
Kenneth Padgett
504-349-5360
New Orleans Area Regional Medical Reserve Corps
1300 Perdido Street
Ste. 8 E 18
New Orleans, LA 70112
Badwi Amin
504-371-2485
Northwest Louisiana Medical Reserve Corps
1511 Doctor’s Drive
Bossier City, LA 71111
Terry Strain
318-425-5351
Plaquemines Parish Medical Reserve Corps
8344 Hwy. 23
Belle Chasse, LA 70037
Benny Puckett
504-391-2004

From MRC website:

http://www.medicalreservecorps.gov/state.asp?state=22

Acadiana Medical Reserve Corps (AMRC) View on Map

825 Kaliste Saloom Road
Brandywine 3, Suite 100
Lafayette, LA 70508
Jennifer Doucet
337-262-5644

Calcasieu Medical Reserve Corps View on Map

707- A
Lake Charles, LA 70601
Angela Jouett
337-475-3217

City of Baton Rouge, Parish of East Baton Rouge View on Map

3773 Harding Blvd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70807
MRC Coordinator
(225) 389-2100

Jefferson Parish Medical Reserve Corps View on Map

1887 Ames Blvd
Marrero, LA 70072
Kenneth Padgett
504-349-5360

New Orleans Area Regional Medical Reserve Corps View on Map

1300 Perdido St.
Ste. 8 E 18
New Orleans, LA 70112
Badwi Amin
504 371 2485

Northwest Louisiana Medical Reserve Corps View on Map

1511 Doctor’s Drive
Bossier City, LA 71111
Terry Strain
318-425-5351

Plaquemines Parish MRC View on Map

8344 Hwy. 23
Belle Chasse, LA 70037
Guy Laigast
504-391-2004

What are ARRL volunteers up to?

August 31, 2008

http://www.arrl.org/gustav/vol.html

This page is for Amateur Radio operators who wish to connect with served agencies who need communication assistance during Hurricane Gustav.

What is the Louisiana National Guard up to?

August 31, 2008

Read about current efforts yourself from the Louisiana National Guard website.

View a FEMA photo of Evacuation bracelets being prepared in Lousiana

Mandatory evac by parish from The Advocate

August 31, 2008

From URL on August 31, 2008

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/27705709.html?showAll=y&c=y

Hurricane Evacuation Listings by parish

* Published: Aug 30, 2008 – UPDATED: 7:25 a.m.

Comments (0)

ASCENSION PARISH
Ascension Parish President Tommy Martinez issued a voluntary evacuation order for all low-lying areas in Ascension Parish because of the potential of extensive flooding in the eastern part of the parish. The areas included are east of La. 431 to the Diversion Canal and north of La. 42 to Bayou Manchac.

ASSUMPTION PARISH
A mandatory evacuation went into effect at 4 p.m. Saturday, said Kim Torres, a spokeswoman for the parish office of emergency preparedness.

CALCASIEU PARISH
A mandatory evacuation has been issued for Sunday at noon.

CAMERON PARISH
A mandatory evacuation is expected to be issued on Sunday morning.

IBERIA PARISH
A mandatory evacuation has been issued for Sunday at 7 a.m.

JEFFERSON PARISH
Mandatory evacuation of Grand Isle began at 1 p.m. on Saturday. A mandatory evacuation for both the West Bank and East Bank was ordered Sunday morning by parish officials.  The mandatory evacuation for the West Bank begins at 9 a.m., with the East Bank mandatory evacuation starting at noon.  A curfew will be in effect starting Sunday, Aug. 31.

LAFOURCHE PARISH
Marshalling points at the Larose Civic Center, Central Lafourche High School and Thibodaux High School will reopen at 7 a.m. today.

A mandatory evacuation was ordered as of 4 p.m. Saturday.

Any resident who signed up to be transported from their home will be taken to one of these marshalling points. They, along with residents who drive themselves to a marshalling point, will be transported out of the parish.

Buses will transport all evacuees to a shelter to be determined.

All marshalling points closed about 7 p.m. Saturday.

LIVINGSTON PARISH
Evacuation is suggested for people living south of Interstate 12 in Livingston Parish, said Brian Fairburn, the parish’s director of emergency preparedness.

A major hurricane surge from Lake Maurepas is expected for the lower part of the parish, emergency officials said.

“If you can get out, secure your residence and get out now,” said Harry Brignac, the French Settlement chief of Police.

“I don’t think we’re going to miss the bullet on this one,” the police chief said.

People can wait until this afternoon to make a decision, but “traffic is going to be horrendous,” he added.

Brignac said his officers will be out in full force until the winds or water get too high, and then will be back on the streets as soon as possible.

Piles of sand have been put out at most fire stations in the parish for people who want to try to sand bag around their homes to hold back the storm surge, Fairburn said.

No shelters have been opened, but North Park and the West Livingston gymnasium will be opened as shelters if necessary, said Will Clark, an aide to the parish president.

ORLEANS PARISH
Orleans Parish has issued a mandatory evacuation for West Bank residents for 8 a.m. Sunday morning. On the East Bank, residents have a mandatory evacuation order beginning at noon Sunday.

PLAQUEMINES PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at noon.

ST. BERNARD PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at 4 p.m.

ST. CHARLES PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at noon.

ST. JAMES PARISH
Parish officials issued a highly recommended evacuation for all residents living south of La. 3127 in the south Vacherie area and those living north of La. 3125 in the Grand Point Area along with residents living in trailers, manufactured homes and flood prone areas.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST
St. John the Baptist Parish has issued a mandatory parishwide evacuation beginning at 8 p.m. Saturday.

ST. MARTIN PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at noon.

ST. MARY PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at 4 p.m.

TANGIPAHOA PARISH
A mandatory evacuation of all mobile homes and travel trailers across the parish goes into effect at 10 a.m. today, Parish President Gordon Burgess said. That evacuation also includes all homes south of La. 22, Burgess said.

“I’m concerned about a 13-to-16-foot storm surge on the south end of the parish and winds of 75 to 100 miles an hour,” the parish president said. “This is a monster.”

TERREBONNE PARISH
A mandatory evacuation was issued for Saturday at 4 p.m.

Find this article at:
http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/27705709.html?showAll=y&c=y

August 31, 2008

One question for me, two questions for you

August 28, 2008

I see from viewing my blog stats people are looking for public transportation evacuation numbers. I didn’t know there were any, however, I searched and found a few numbers. I had to Ask Louise from the Louisiana.gov website:

2008 Hurricane: 311 Information line for the City of New Orleans
Question
Information center during emergencies or disasters affecting the City of New Orleans
Answer
311 is the non-emergency information line for the city services of New Orleans. 311 is designed to be your one call to City Hall to gain information or inquire about city services. The 311 Call Center also serves as the information center during emergencies or disasters affecting the City of New Orleans. Residents who require evacuation assistance must register with the 311 Call Center.
The hearing impaired can dial 504-658-2059 or 1-800-981-6652. Spanish and Vietnamese language assistance is available.

The specially trained 311 representatives are available from 7AM to 11PM Monday – Friday, and 8AM to 5PM on Saturday. Outside these hours, you can leave a message and a representative will return your call within 48 hours.

What happens if Gustav hits on Sunday?

Now this guy, Mr. Evans has posted a question from Gulfport, Mississippi via Los Angeles Times in blue tape across the side of an  “old” FEMA trailer. The LA Times had this to say:

“While other protesters carried signs demonstrating against U.S. involvement in Iraq or conditions at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, Derrick Evans arrived from Gulfport, Miss., hauling an old Federal Emergency Management Agency trailer bearing messages with a different sort of theme.

One, in blue tape on the side of the trailer, read:  (This is Question One) “Where did $129 billion for Gulf Coast hurricane recovery go?

and…Evans said, “would have no recovery if not for volunteers.

So I surf on over to another article, New Oxfam Report on Eve of Katrina Anniversary Details Roadblocks to Gulf Coast Recovery. Read the report yourself here. I don’t doubt the fact that finding adequate housing is a problem as it was a problem BEFORE Katrina.  I don’t doubt, too, that outside agencies are sucking all of the funds out of programs designed to help Hurricane Katrina victims.  I’m seeing it with my own eyes.  They hire these people to send me late fliers, ask me to fill out more paperwork so that they can evaluate whether or not I’m “eligible”. Meanwhile, these folks collect a pay check.  Their bosses collect paychecks.  And your paperwork gets shuffled around another group of people who are getting paychecks.  All of these people are reaping the rewards of the “Hurricane Katrina Fund” compliments of the US Government.  And this leaves me with question two: Why not Louisiana based organizations that had establishment prior to Katrina?

Meanwhile, if that doesn’t interest you go and visit the Katrina Memorial where 54 of 85 bodies have been identified. Or you can go to Biloxi, Mississippi an visit their Katrina Memorial, too.